Sammy J

Sammy J is an award winning comedian, writer and songbird. From Melbourne to Edinburgh, he has earned a reputation as one of the most exciting and inventive performers on the international comedy scene. Sammy J is also a former Big Brother so he knows firsthand how the program can influence the life and development of a young person.

Sammy mentored his ‘little brother’ for 18 months and helped the boy make a smooth transition from grade six to year seven. They would spend a few hours together every Saturday morning, playing Frisbee and chess, visiting the local library and making short films on their phones.

Sammy quickly learned that being a mentor was not just about taking his little brother on fun adventures. The most important element in every Big Brothers Big Sisters relationship is the giving of your time – and genuine friendship.

“Hearing the kids speak about the program is incredible,” he says. “It’s clichéd to say it changes lives, but it really does. For most of them, it’s the first time they’ve got someone they can really truly trust and rely on. They’ve got someone who’s not judging them and someone who isn’t really involved in their family life. You can reel off statistics about how it keeps them off the streets and out of jail, but on an emotional level, it’s a really positive experience for everyone involved.”

 
 

Cameron Ling

As former captain for Geelong, Cameron Ling has faced his fair share of challenges, but none as great as those facing the young people he is helping through his support of the Big Brothers Big Sisters mentoring program. Involved with the Geelong branch of the not for profit organisation for some time, Ling has formalised his involvement by lending his name and profile to the cause as an official ambassador.

“I cannot praise highly enough the great work Big Brothers Big Sisters does with young people through their volunteer mentoring program. Having a positive role model is vital for the development of children and adolescents and so many kids are, unfortunately, missing out on this for various reasons. This is where Big Brothers Big Sisters comes in, providing hundreds of vulnerable ‘Littles’ each year with a volunteer mentor or ‘Big’,” says Ling.

“The organisation makes a real and valuable difference to both young people and the community as a whole by working to prevent antisocial behaviours. I am proud to lend my name to Big Brothers Big Sisters and draw attention to the vital work they do.”

Michael Carr - Gregg

One of Australia’s preeminent psychologists, Dr Michael Carr-Gregg, is lending his expert knowledge and media profile to the Big Brothers Big Sisters cause, signing on as ambassador for the youth mentoring organisation. A nationally registered child and adolescent psychologist, Dr Carr-Gregg is passionate about enhancing the health and wellbeing of young people, making him a valuable contributor to the well-regarded volunteer program.

“I greatly admire the work of Big Brothers Big Sisters. Having a positive role model to help build resilience in vulnerable children and adolescents is most beneficial and many kids are, unfortunately, missing out on this for various reasons. This is where Big Brothers Big Sisters comes in, providing hundreds of vulnerable ‘Littles’ each year with a volunteer mentor or ‘Big’,” says Dr Carr-Gregg.

“The organisation makes an invaluable difference to both young people and the community as a whole by working to prevent antisocial behaviours and help young people reach their true potential. I am proud to use my position to draw attention to the vital work they do.”